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Submitted: 04 April 2018 Modified: 29 January 2019
HERDIN Record #: R06-WVSU-18040416082781

Obesity and hypertension among adolescent high school students in Iloilo City.

Emiliana G. Carmona

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BACKGROUND: Obesity is an increasing global concern. In adults, Obesity is associated with causes of morbidity and morality like hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. Although Obesity in children is rarely associated with serious health concerns, the influence of obesity in adult hypertension increase as they child ages.


OBJECTIVE: The study sought to determine if there was correlation between obesity and hypertension among adolescent high school students.


METHODS: This was an observational, analytic, cross-sectional study involving randomly selected high school students in Iloilo City. After getting the consent of high school principal and students' parents, each student's height, weight and blood pressure were taken any time of the day during school days. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and plotted on the age-sex-specific chart and BMI percentile was determined.


RESULT: The study population was 2517 (11.92% of the total population). One hundred forty or 5.56% were considered obese while 2.07% were hypertensive. There were more male obese than females; more males were hypertensive; more obese and hypertensive students were in the private schools. Of the obese, only 25% hypertensive. Of the non-obese, 0.67% were hypertensive. Among the students with hypertension, 69.23% were obese while 30.77% were non-obese.


CONCLUSION: There is greater prevalence of obesity and hypertension among males and those in private high school. There is a weak positive correlation between BMI and systolic and diastolic pressures.


 


KEYWORDS: Obesity, hypertension, adolescent, body mass index.


 


   

Publication Type
Book of Abstracts
Publication Sub Type
Compendium
Title
Compendium of Abstracts
Date
2011
Page(s)
17
LocationLocation CodeAvailable FormatAvailability
West Visayas State University College of Medicine Library Abstract Print Format