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Submitted: 11 December 2015 Modified: 11 December 2015
HERDIN Record #: CAR-UCBCF-15121107173319

Gender and sexual reproductive health issues among the indigenous peoples of the Cordillera.

Erlinda C. Palaganas

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Gender and sexual reproductive health is a growing concern because of the 
multitude of problems faced by developing nations and particularly the expected 
increase in the population of young adults.  As such, reproductive health according to 
the United Nations, has been defined in the Cairo Conference to cover not only 
physical health or freedom from disease, per se, but complete physical, mental and 
social well-being in all matters relating to reproductive health system and to its 
functions and processes.
     The issue of gender in the Cordillera has generated interest and debate among 
groups, those in health development included. Some quarters contend that there are 
no gender inequalities among indigenous groups in the Cordillera since the 
Cordillera people successfully resisted Spanish feudal conquest. On the other hand, 
recent studies based on actual field experiences establish that gender biases and 
stereotypes do exist among Cordillera indigenous groups. Inequities in health are 
created by the gender gap in terms of gender roles and images that influence men 
and women's access to health resources. Viewed from a holistic perspective, 
however, inequalities in health status between groups and even between men and 
women are largely traceable to social differentials, e.g., income, educational 
attainment, civil status, employment and working conditions, quality of health/social 
services and physical environment. Gender biases make daily living doubly hard for 
women even when they are already weighed down with socio-economic problems.
 Similarly, socio-economic factors heighten gender inequalities.

Publication Type
Others
Place of Publication
Baguio City
Publication Date
2008

Objectives



































































Gender and sexual reproductive health is a growing concern because of the 
multitude of problems faced by developing nations and particularly the expected 
increase in the population of young adults.  As such, reproductive health according to 
the United Nations, has been defined in the Cairo Conference to cover not only 
physical health or freedom from disease, per se, but complete physical, mental and 
social well-being in all matters relating to reproductive health system and to its 
functions and processes.
     The issue of gender in the Cordillera has generated interest and debate among 
groups, those in health development included. Some quarters contend that there are 
no gender inequalities among indigenous groups in the Cordillera since the 
Cordillera people successfully resisted Spanish feudal conquest. On the other hand, 
recent studies based on actual field experiences establish that gender biases and 
stereotypes do exist among Cordillera indigenous groups. Inequities in health are 
created by the gender gap in terms of gender roles and images that influence men 
and women's access to health resources. Viewed from a holistic perspective, 
however, inequalities in health status between groups and even between men and 
women are largely traceable to social differentials, e.g., income, educational 
attainment, civil status, employment and working conditions, quality of health/social 
services and physical environment. Gender biases make daily living doubly hard for 
women even when they are already weighed down with socio-economic problems.
 Similarly, socio-economic factors heighten gender inequalities.