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Submitted: 29 October 2011 Modified: 12 December 2011
HERDIN Record #: R07-CDU-10291110102749

Level of parental stress and coping behavior among parents with autistic child in Zapatera Special Education Center: basis for coping behavior enhancement program .

Chrisette Randyll C. Torregosa,
Jobelle F. Antipas,
Keeyes N. Montallana,
Rhea Vichelle Y. Musa,
Rozele Marie N. Rallon,
Monica Gwyn D. Tabanao,
Marie Franz H. Tabay,
Janzel B. Taladro,
Kharla Marisse T. Ting,
Marian Cecelia M. Tumampos,
Ariene Andrea B. Valera

Design: The study utilized the descriptive correlational design.


Setting: This was held in Zapatera Special Education Center, Sikatuna St., Cebu City.


Respondents: The study included eighteen (18) parents having autistic children belonging to the lower category based on the classification system of Zapatera Special Education Center.


Instruments: A researcher-made questionnaire, which is composed of two parts: Parental Stress Scale and Parental Coping Scale was utilized in the study. Parental Stress Scale is a researcher-made questionnaire patterned from the Parental Stress Scale by Joan O. Berry and Warren H. Jones which assessed the level of stress of parents when caring for their autistic child was utilized. This is composed of ten questions using the Likert scale. Scoring was done by summing the responses on each item. Parental Coping Scale is a researcher-made questionnaire patterned from Coping Health Inventory Scale for Parents by Hamilton I. McCubbin et al. which ascertained the degree of coping the parents utilize in managing their perceived stress and anxiety experienced in caring for their children with autism. This is composed of ten questions using the Likert scale. Scoring was done by summing the responses on each item.


Procedure: The researchers obtained an approval from the Principal of Zapatera Special Education Center to conduct the study in the center. The purpose of the study was explained to the respondents and informed consent was obtained. The researchers distributed the questionnaires to the parents with autistic child in the said center. Researchers were assigned to entertain any questions. After 15-30 minutes, the answered questionnaires were collected and a follow-up interview was conducted to clarify their answers. Their corresponding answers were tallied, analyzed and interpreted to derive a conclusion.


Results: The level of parental stress and the level of coping behavior had a mean score of 36.28 ± 7.87 and 39.00 ± 7.32 respectively. This implied that majority of the parents with an autistic child enrolled in Zapatera Special Education Center experienced a high level of parental stress and a high level of coping behavior. The Pearson r correlation value was -0.49 (p=0.04). This meant that parental stress and their coping behavior had a moderate negative correlation. This implied that with a moderate increase in the level of parental stress, there was also a moderate decrease in the coping behavior of parents with autistic child.


Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it is concluded that there was a significant relationship between the level of parental stress and coping behavior among parents with autistic child. The parents in their high level of stress were slowly grasping and applying information regarding the condition of their child. Despite of it, they were well adjusted and they accepted the child, not thinking of it as deficit. However, stress and coping had a moderate negative correlation which implied that as the level of parental stress moderately increased, there was a moderate decrease in coping.

Publication Type
Thesis/Dissertations
Thesis Degree
BS
Specialization
Nursing
Publication Date
April 2011

Objectives

This study aimed to determine the relationship between the level of parental stress and coping behavior among parents with autistic child in Zapatera Special Education Center.

LocationLocation CodeAvailable FormatAvailability
Mandaue City U5 L576t Abstract Print Format
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