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Submitted: 05 February 2014 Modified: 13 June 2014
HERDIN Record #: R04A-DLSHSI-14020509405122

The effect of crystalloid vs colloid coloading for spinal anesthesia in patients for emergency cesarean delivery at De La Salle University Medical Center

Abstract

Objective: Fluid loading is the most benign technique and frequently used for the prevention of spinal-induced hypotension in cesarean delivery. Crystalloid coloading does not consistently efficacious because of its rapid distribution, but colloid remains longer in the intravascular space. This study is to compare the influence of cyrstalloid and colloid coloading during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery.

Methods: Sisty term pregnancy women, singleton, with no medical problem, for emergency cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia were recruited and randomly received coloading with 1L LR or 500 mL hetastarch. After spinal block, vital signs every 2 min were monitored and recorded. The incidence of hypotension, lowest blood pressure, maternal nausea and vomiting and Apgar scores were recorded.

Results: The incidence of hypotension and lowest SBP recorded were significant between the groups (P=0.03 and P=<0.01). To prevent hypotension, smaller volume and shorter duration of fluid loading were needed compared to crystalloid group (bith have P=<0.01).

Conclusion: Colloid coloading can offer flexibility and efficacy in the prvention of spinal-induced hypotension. Therefore, colloid coloading can be also done in cases with shorter preparation time.

Objectives

Fluid loading is the most benign technique and frequently used for the prevention of spinal-induced hypotension in cesarean delivery. Crystalloid coloading does not consistently efficacious because of its rapid distribution, but colloid remains longer in the intravascular space. This study is to compare the influence of cyrstalloid and colloid coloading during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery.

LocationCall NumberAvailable FormatAvailability
3/F Room 6301 De La Salle Angelo King Medical Research Center Abstract Print Format