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HERDIN Record #: NCR-JRRMMC-06141212061296 Submitted: 14 June 2012 Modified: 14 June 2012

Outcomes of damage control in trauma surgery in JRRMMC.

Paul Warren Saludez,
Michael Mercado,
Joseph Juico

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CONTEXT:
The approach of damage control surgery in trauma is not new; abdominal packing of liver injuries has been accepted treatment strategy for some time. What is new, however; is the realization that an abbreviated laparotomy or completion of only the essential portions of the operation is often the best treatment for the patient as a whole.

OBJECTIVE:
To describe results of damage control in trauma surgery done at JRRMMC from the period of 2004-2006.

STUDY SETTING:
Department of Surgery, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center, 2004-2006

LIMITATIONS:
Trauma patients have different degrees of response to resuscitation. It maybe safe to say that no matter how aggressive a surgeon is with a non responder, the outcome would be predicted as everyone would. One aspect of limitation is the collection of data. As a tertiary government hospital, we are not yet able to gather data in the most precise detail that we want. Computer based data boasts of the most precise demographics that we need with just a flick of your finger tips.

Another aspect is the lack of stratification of patients during the initial assessment. These may include baseline injury severity score, temperature, blood gases etc.

Despite these limitations that persistently plague the system, it is still our privilege to present our data with much pride and contentment.

CONCLUSIONS:
Damage control in trauma patients at JRRMMC, will remain a permanent armamentarium that the department will continue to advocate even with a fair 50% recovery rate. Surgery is a very dynamic art and the craftsmanship of every trauma resident surgeon will continue to improve to every outcome of damage control laparotomy in each patient. The dictum remains that damage control surgery for trauma is successful with early recognition, control of contamination and hemorrhage, resuscitation and proper timing of reconstruction. These will serve as pillars which will stand for the continuous improvement of our surgeries.

Publication Type
Research Report
Date
January 1, 2004-December 31, 2006

Objectives

Objective:
To describe results of damage control in trauma surgery done at JRRMMC from the period of 2004-2006.

LocationLocation CodeAvailable FormatAvailability
Medical Library, 5/F Training and Research Office, Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical Center Abstract Print Format
 

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